Tag Archives: Colchester Stour Valley Sudbury & Halstead Railway

Some Early Lines – Old Railway Companies – More LNER

Some Early Lines – Old Railway Companies

More LNER

The Caledonian and Dumbartonshire Junction Railway

bowling-station-older-station

Bowling Station:  west-dunbarton.gov.uk/

The Caledonian and Dumbartonshire Junction Railway (C&DJR) was a Scottish railway opened in 1850 between Bowling and Balloch via Dumbarton. The company had intended to build to Glasgow but it could not raise the money.

Other railways later reached Dumbarton, and the C&DJR was taken over by the larger Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway in 1862. It later became simply a branch of the larger North British Railway network.

When the rival Lanarkshire and Dumbartonshire Railway proposed a line to Balloch running close nearby, agreement was reached to make part of the former C&DJR line jointly owned, and this was done in 1896, forming the Dumbarton and Balloch Joint Railway.

Most of the original C&DJR line continues in use at the present day.

Important note: the spelling Dumbartonshire was consistently used in official documentation in the nineteenth century, notwithstanding the later use of Dunbartonshire for the county.

London Midland & Scottish and London & North Eastern Railway poster promoting Scotland for holidays. Showing a couple enjoying the view of the lough with a boat in the background. c 1940s. Artwork by Patrick James MacIntosh.

London Midland & Scottish and London & North Eastern Railway poster promoting Scotland for holidays. Showing a couple enjoying the view of the lough with a boat in the background. c 1940s. Artwork by Patrick James MacIntosh.

Locally promoted, and authorised on 26 June 1846, capital was hard to find until a lease was taken by a steamer company.  The line ran between Glasgow and Bowling, opening from Dumbarton on 15 june1850 and being the means by which many saw Loch Lomond for the first time.  Both Caledonian Railway and Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway had routes to Dumbarton – this was the E&GR one, but before that it had combined with the Glasgow, Dumbarton and Helensburgh Railway to form the Dumbartonshire Railways.

Colchester, Stour Valley, Sudbury & Halstead Railway.

leaving-marks-tey

A locomotive leaves Marks Tey station at the end of August, 1956. Picture: Amberley Publishing

Colchester, Stour Valley, Sudbury & Halstead Railway.

This 34¾ mile line linked Colchester and Cambridge, though authority (26 June 1846) was given only to the Marks Tey – Sudbury section at first, including the 335 yard Chappel viaduct.

chappel-viaduct-chapel-org

Chappel Viaduct  (chappel.org

Extension to Lavenham, Long Melford and Clare, with a branch from Lavenham to Bury St. Edmunds, was sanctioned on 8 June 1847 – the Act also authorised the Ipswich and Bury St. Edmunds railway to lease it. When the Eastern Union Railway amalgamated with the Ipswich & Bury St. Edmunds Railway, it repudiated the lease, but, later, reluctantly, honoured it after all.  Formal opening of the line to Sudbury was on 2 July 1849, and on to Haverhill in August 1865, where it joined the Cambridge – Haverhill section, open on 1 June.  The Company amalgamated with the Great Eastern Railway by an Act of 1 July 1898.  The East Anglian Railway Museum is established in the goods yards at Chappel & Wakes Colne.

chappel-station

Chappel Station, once belonging to the Colchester, Stour Valley, Sudbury & Halstead Railway, is now the headquarters of the East Anglian Railway Museum.  Near the doors of the GER goods shed stands a newly restored GE four-wheeled carriage.  (C.Awdrey

 

Deerness Valley Railway

west_durham_rail_tour_1958-ushaw-moor-stn

 Ushaw Moor Station 

http://ushawmoor.awardspace.info/history/West_Durham_Rail_Tour_1958.htm

The Deerness Valley Railway was an 8-mile long single track branch railway line that ran along the valley of the River Deerness in County Durham, England. Built by the North Eastern Railway, it ran from Deerness Valley Junction, on the Durham to Bishop Auckland line, to the coal mines along the valley via two intermediate stations, Waterhouses, and Ushaw Moor

ushaw-moor-viaduct

The Deerness Valley Railway’s tortuous link with the Stockton & Darlington Railway at Crook included this timber viaduct at Ushaw Moor.  (K.L.Taylor

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