Category Archives: Chasewater Railway Museum

Chasewater Railway Museum – Category, Carriage Equipment

Chasewater Railway Museum 

Category, Carriage Equipment

 

210Light controller Switch box for carriage lighting control. LMS Oct. 1986 R1.S2

210 Light controller Switch box for carriage lighting control. LMS Oct. 1986 R1.S2

219Window glass Frosted pane of glass from carriage toilet window. Mid Oct. 1986 R4.S1

219 Window glass Frosted pane of glass from carriage toilet window. Mid Oct. 1986 R4.S1

229Vacuum Gauge Gauge to indicate vacuum in brake pipes GE Oct. 1986 R4.S3

229 Vacuum Gauge Gauge to indicate vacuum in brake pipes GE Oct. 1986 R4.S3

980Carpet LMS LMS Oct. 1986 R5.B1.S3

980 Carpet LMS LMS Oct. 1986 R5.B1.S3

 

carriage-equip

 

 

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Railway Preservation in the 1980s and 1990s

Railway Preservation in the 1980s and 1990s

From 1993

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Pannier tank No.4698 blasts out of Norchard Centre on the Dean Forest Railway in charge of a freight charter.  (Photo: Robin Stewart-Smith

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New star for Gwili.  Severn Valley’s small prairie tank No.4566 which will get star billing at South Wales Gwili Railway next season (1994).  ( Photo: John Fairclough.

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Railway Preservation in the 1980s & 90s

Railway Preservation in the 1980s & 90s

A few more photos from 1993.

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60132 ‘Blue Peter’ on the 14.00 dep. Approaching Kinneil Station during the Bo’ness Gala.  Picture – Robin Stewart-Smith.

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Julie Roper’s award winning photo from 1993.  Taken at 8.45 am on a freezing January morning at Burrs on the East Lancashire Railway.

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Most preserved railways use the closed winter season for the type of permanent-way works which would have interfered with passenger services during the summer months – but few could give their trackmen this type of view with every shovel-full!  Here we see Hunslet Diesel Hydraulic ‘Ninian’ in charge of a works train near the summit of the only rack and pinion public railway in Britain – The Snowdon Mountain Railway – which starts at Llanberis, North Wales.    Photo Gerald Webster.

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Some Early Lines – Old Railway Companies – A couple of old LNER lines

Some Early Lines

Old Railway Companies

Berwickshire Railway, Bishop’s Stortford,Dunmow & Braintree Railway

A couple of old LNER lines

Berwickshire Railway.

Incorporated on 17 July 1862, the line provided a cross-country route from the Duns branch of the North British Railway to the Tweed Valley at St. Boswells.  The first sod was cut by Lady Campbell at Easton Park on 14 October 1862, though the line opened to Earlston on 16 November 1863, construction of the Leaderfoot viaduct delayed things.  St. Boswells was reached on 2 October 1865.  The company amalgamated with the NBR under an Act of 13 July 1876, with effect from 1 August. Floods on 12 August 1948 caused so much damage to the line that it closed to passengers between Duns and Earlston immediately.

The Duns Branch and the Berwickshire Railway together formed a through railway route from Reston, near Berwick-upon-Tweed, to St Boswells in the Scottish Borders. The line was promoted in two stages. The first was from Reston on the Edinburgh to Berwick main line to Duns (then spelt Dunse, and the county town of Berwickshire); it opened by the North British Railway in 1849.

The second section was promoted independently by the Berwickshire Railway Company, but with considerable assistance from the North British Railway. It opened most of its line in 1863, but delay in constructing a large viaduct, Leaderfoot Viaduct, led to the opening of the final section of the line being delayed until 1865.

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The Berwickshire Railway’s superb viaduct across the Tweed at Leaderfoot 19-4-1988

The North British Railway had conceived the line as a strategic trunk route across southern Scotland, but this development was never realised, and the line was never heavily used.

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Earlston station in around 1905. Image © copyright Graham and Emma Maxwell and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons License

During the violent rainstorm in the area in August 1948 the line was breached west of Earlston, and the passenger train service ceased permanently. Duns reverted to being a branch line terminus from Reston until that too was closed to passengers in 1951.

Bishop’s Stortford, Dunmore & Braintree Railway

Incorporated on 22 July 1861 to build an 18 mile link between Bishop’s Stortford and an end-on junction with the Maldon, Witham & Braintree Railway at Braintree, it ran into trouble long before completion.  The Great Eastern had already acquired transfer powers (21 July 1863) and the company was vested by an Act of 29 July 1865, becoming part of its system on opening day, 22 February 1869.  The line was closed, apart from some seaside excursions, with effect from 3 March 1952, but the line was used in June 1960 to test BRs prototype ‘Road-Railer’.

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Dunmow Station – By Steven Duhig from Bowie, Maryland, USA – MWB16Uploaded by scillystuff, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7437021

The line was originally one of several schemes promoted in the 19th century, which included north-south routes connecting Great Dunmow with Epping, Halstead and/or Saffron Walden. The route of the built line was proposed by the Eastern Counties Railway in 1859, the line from Bishop’s Stortford, Dunmow and Braintree was eventually built by Great Eastern Railway who had since absorbed ECR. Construction started in 1864 and the route opened on 22 February 1869. The line initially served Takeley, Felstead and Rayne with Easton Lodge being added in 1894, Hockerill in 1910, and finally Stane Street and Bannister Green in 1922.

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Takeley Station, on the Bishop’s Stortford, Dunmow & Braintree line, has seen no passengers since 1952, but remains in good condition. (1990). (C.Awdrey

Steam preservation in the 1980s & 90s

Steam preservation in the 1980s & 90s

From a publication dated 1993

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It was recent in 1993!

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Back in 1993 clearance work had been undertaken on the Leicester Extension, opening up this new viewpoint near Birstall, where 34039 ‘Boscastle’ is seen on the 14.25 Loughborough Central – Leicester North.  The coach immediately behing the locomotive is a BSO No. W9316, which is converted for the disabled.   It recently re-entered traffic after extensive overhaul, and carries WR chocolate and cream livery – the first Mark 1 on the GCR to do so.

Photograph: Melville L.T.Holley.

Photographs of an Ambulance Train – 1914

1914 photographs from the Museum Collection

Photographs of an Ambulance Train – 1914

This is a selection of photographs of a First World War Ambulance Train from David Ives’ collection, given to the Chasewater Railway Museum by Robert Ives.

Reposted today on the 100th Anniversary of the start of the Battle of the Somme

Great Eastern Railway Ambulance Train - Invalid Ward - Cots out of use, Aug 1914

Great Eastern Railway Ambulance Train – Invalid Ward – Cots out of use, Aug 1914

 

Great Eastern Railway Ambulance Train - Kitchen - Aug 1914

Great Eastern Railway Ambulance Train – Kitchen – Aug 1914

Great Eastern Railway Ambulance Train - Invalid Ward - Aug 1914

Great Eastern Railway Ambulance Train – Invalid Ward – Aug 1914

Invalid Ward GER Ambulance Train - Aug 1914

Invalid Ward GER Ambulance Train – Aug 1914

 

Ward Car  for infectious cases.  Ambulance Train No.20, Great Eastern Railway, Stratford, September 1915

Ward Car for infectious cases. Ambulance Train No.20, Great Eastern Railway, Stratford, September 1915

Staff Car arranged for sleeping.  Great Eastern Railway Ambulance Train, Aug 1914

Staff Car arranged for sleeping. Great Eastern Railway Ambulance Train, Aug 1914

Pharmacy - Ambulance Train No. 20 GER Sept 1915

Pharmacy – Ambulance Train No. 20 GER Sept 1915

One of Chasewater Railway Museum’s Exhibits

One of Chasewater Railway Museum’s Exhibits

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Over the years, the Chasewater Railway Museum has collected a number of items which are transport but not necesserily railway connected.  Included are a number of canal signs which were collected something like 50 years ago and if we hadn’t saved them they would have probably been scrapped.

This bridge weight restriction notice has been with us for many years, but we still don’t know what the ordinary traffic was!  Lol.

Those new models at home

Chasewater Railway Museum

The latest models locked away with the collection.

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Not a bad assortment of Hornby models.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Additions to our railway models

Chasewater Railway Museum

Additions to our railway models

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A recent donation of various items of ‘0’ gauge rolling stock, track and accessories has added a further dimension to the Chasewater Railway Museum collection of tin-plate model trains.

Of particular note are a Hornby No.2 tank locomotive of 4-4-4 wheel arrangement in LNER livery with crest on the side of the cab.  This clockwork model dates from 1926.  Also of Hornby manufacture are four No.1 passenger coaches of simple appearance, these in LNER brown with clerestory roofs (or should that be rooves? – spellchecker says they are both right!), these little four-wheelers date back to the late 1920s.

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Two further LNER vehicles, and in nice condition, are two bogie wagons, a No.2 timber wagon made during the period 1924-1926 and a No.2 lumber wagon from the same period.

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Lions and Wheels (British Railways’ lion emblems, 1949-1964)

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Photo of BR Coat of Arms from the Chasewater Railway Museum Collection

lions and wheels (British Railways’ lion emblems, 1949-1964).